Dual Enrollment can be a college cost saver but it can affect your teens social connections.

How Dual Enrollment Impacts Your Child’s Social Interactions

Dual Enrollment can be a college cost saver but it can affect your teens social connections.This is the last article in my series about what I learned about dual enrollment. If you haven’t seen my previous articles – 4 Things About Dual Enrollment and Is Dual Enrollment a Right Choice for Your Child? – you can click on the titles to read them.

The high school years can be such a challenging time. Our kids are growing up, trying to fit in, figuring out who they are, and finding out what they want for their future. Social interactions with their friends play an even more important role in high school. They cherish their friends and know that their time together may be running out as they probably not see many of them after graduation.

The final factors that you should consider are around social interactions and time requirements.

Different School Calendars – Start dates, breaks, and end dates are never the same for high schools and colleges. Most high schools start before college does and the high school may have a Fall Break but the college doesn’t. Your child will need to be more diligent in keeping up with their calendar. They may get feelings of being left out when their friends are off for a break and they still have to take classes.

Decreased Social Interaction – Not attending high school full time will affect your child’s social relationships. They might miss out on social outings like homecoming festivities because they have to attend class. They may feel isolated because they miss events and can’t join conversations when their friends are talking about something that happened when they weren’t around. Your child will have to make more of an effort to spend time with their friends.

Allowing Time for Commuting – I heard from guidance counselors that many kids in dual enrollment make the mistake of signing up for courses without considering the commute time to get to the school. For example, a student may end their high school day at 3:00 pm and sign up for a college course at 3:30 pm. They forget that it takes 30 minutes to get to the college and they have to find a place to park, get to the building, etc. One way to counter this issue is to sign up for online courses, when possible.

Missing Important Announcements – In high school, your child gets many reminders or announcements of changes via the intercom, teacher reminders, and through friends.  Being out of high school full-time puts more responsibility on the student and parents to check teacher blogs, school blogs, and to communicate with the homeroom teacher. This is especially important in their senior year, as there are many graduation deadlines and activities that you do not want to miss.

I hope you found my dual enrollment series helpful. What are some key things you learned? What else do you think should be considered? Post your answers in the comments below.

Dual Enrollment Could Impact Your Teen’s Social Interactions

This is the last article in my series about what I learned about dual enrollment. If you haven’t seen my previous articles – 4 Things About Dual Enrollment and Is Dual Enrollment a Right Choice for Your Teen? – you can click on the titles to read them.

The high school years can be such a challenging time. Our teens are growing up, trying to fit in, figuring out who they are, and finding out what they want for their future. Social interactions with their friends play an even more important role in high school. They cherish their friends and know that their time together may be running out as they probably not see many of them after graduation.

The final factors that you should consider are about social interactions and time requirements.

Different School Calendars – Start dates, breaks, and end dates are never the same for high schools and colleges. Most high schools start before college does and the high school may have a Fall Break but the college doesn’t. Your child will need to be more diligent in keeping up with their calendar. They may get feelings of being left out when their friends are off for a break and they still have to take classes.

Decreased Social Interaction – Not attending high school full time will affect your teen’s social relationships. They might miss out on social outings like homecoming festivities because they have to attend class. They may feel isolated because they miss events and can’t join conversations when their friends are talking about something that happened when they weren’t around. Your child will have to make more of an effort to spend time with their friends.

Allowing Time for Commuting – I heard from guidance counselors that many teens in dual enrollment make the mistake of signing up for courses without considering the commute time to get to the school. For example, a student may end their high school day at 3:00 pm and sign up for a college course at 3:30 pm. They forget that it takes 30 minutes to get to the college and they have to find a place to park, get to the building, etc. One way to counter this issue is to sign up for online courses, when possible.

Missing Important Announcements – In high school, your teen gets many reminders or announcements of changes via the intercom, teacher reminders, and through friends.  Being out of high school full-time puts more responsibility on the student and parents to check teacher blogs, school blogs, and to communicate with the homeroom teacher. This is especially important in their senior year, as there are many graduation deadlines and activities that you do not want to miss.

I hope you found my dual enrollment series helpful. What are some key things you learned? What else do you think should be considered? Post your answers in the comments below.

Is dual enrollment a good fit for your teen?

Is Dual Enrollment Right For Your Teen?

I have share with you the you to the concept of dual enrollment. This is where your teen can take college courses while still in high school. I talked about the four things you need to know about dual enrollment. If you missed it, you can click here to read it.

One of the four things I outlined is that dual enrollment is not for everybody. In the seminar I attended, they mentioned several things to consider that I would have not thought about. I have included the top five here for you:

  • Maturity Level – In college there can be content discussions in and out of the classroom that your teen may not be prepared for. For example, high schoolers may not be comfortable discussing sexual development in open groups, but such discussions could be part of psychology class.
  • Initiative – Is your teen a self-starter? Do they get their homework done without you having to remind them? Do they study for tests days before or cram the night before? Do they ask for help when they need it? In college, your student’s success is in their own hands. Parents do not have access to grades or get to have parent/teacher conferences. If your teen is not organized and able to stay on top of what they need to do, dual enrollment might not be a good fit. At the seminar, they told one story where a parent found out that their teen, who was in dual enrollment, had not attended any classes. It was already near the end of the semester.
  • Specific Major in Mind – Dual enrollment can be great for your teen if they already know what they want to major in. It provides them a great jumpstart and can increase the likelihood that they will get accepted into that major immediately.
  • Lengthy Graduate Program – Dual enrollment can be a good option if your teen wants to enter a profession that requires many years of schooling, like being a doctor or lawyer. Starting sooner can lead to graduating faster.
  • Child Who Is Not Interested In High School – Some teens are not really interested in high school and ready to move on. They may be bored and ready for greater challenges or prepared to take on more responsibility for managing their time. Dual enrollment could provide that to mature students.

Next week, I will share the final things I learned that you want to consider when making decisions about dual enrollment. What is one of the big considerations you have about this, post your answer in the comments below.

My Ideal College can help you determine if dual enrollment is right for your high school student.

4 Fundamental Things to Know About Dual Enrollment

My Ideal College can help you determine if dual enrollment is right for your high school student.Dual enrollment is a concept that somewhat eluded me. It’s an opportunity for teens to take college courses while still in high school. Many states offer this program under a variety of names, such as Jumpstart, Concurrent Enrollment, Running Start, etc.

I jumped at the opportunity to attend a seminar about dual enrollment at a local school. As a parent, I needed to know – Should I consider dual enrollment for my kids?  For my clients, I wanted to provide information to help them decide.

Here are the four fundamental things I learned:

  • You Can Save Money – dual enrollment is a great way to save money on college tuition. Tuition and textbooks are paid for 100% through the program. With college tuition costing an average of $20,000 a year, dual enrollment can be a big help in reducing that amount. You could save an entire semester of tuition and fees.
  • It’s Not for Everybody – just because the program can save you money doesn’t necessarily mean it’s right for your teen. There are many other considerations such as maturity level, initiative, course load, scheduling, etc. There is so much to consider here.
  • Varying Entrance Requirements – each university and technical college has different requirements to participate. Some differences include test score requirements, ages that can apply, semesters they can attend, and so on. You’ll want to research the requirements for the schools you want to consider. Most schools have dual enrollment requirements posted on their websites.
  • Work with Your School Guidance Counselor – the high school guidance counselor is a great resource to provide insights on which schools to attend, to guide you through the application process, and to work with scheduling.

What are your thoughts? Is dual enrollment something you are considering for your teen? Do you know of students who have participated? What was it like for them? Post in the comments below.

Watch for more of what I learned in upcoming posts.